fbpx
September 27, 2022
narcissism

Image by <a href="https://pixabay.com/users/clker-free-vector-images-3736/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=28854">Clker-Free-Vector-Images</a> from <a href="https://pixabay.com/?utm_source=link-attribution&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=image&utm_content=28854">Pixabay</a>

Narcissism: Becoming Blind to my faults. It seems to me that a major challenge today it is that it is too to see the faults of others, but not my own faults. I close people off, I shut them out, I tell others that people who disagree with me are stupid, they are idiots, and I insult them in many ways.
Narcissism: Becoming Blind to My Faults. Homily given at Christian Brothers College High School, Town and Country, Missouri.
narcissism
Image by Ben Kerckx from Pixabay

Narcissism: Becoming Blind to my faults

It seems to me that a major challenge today it is that it is too to see the faults of others, but not my own faults. I close people off, I shut them out, I tell others that people who disagree with me are stupid, they are idiots, and I insult them in many ways.

But when I do this, what is really happening is that I am shutting out God, and rejecting an opportunity to grow in his grace. I reject believing that “for God all things are possible.” I become blinded to my own need for conversion, and thereby rob myself of being able to hear God say, “Return home and recount what God has done for you.

If each human being is made in the image and likeness of God, it can at least be the case that each person offers the potential for me to learn a little about God. I can at least think about how it is that I could be surprised by God and what he can do for me. I limit God.

And if limit God then I fail to see those areas where I myself need God. By focusing on the faults of others I can pretend that I have no faults of my own. It is a sure sign of narcissism when in my life I shut out what it is that God can do for me.

The role of Jonathan

Jonathan
Image by Dim Hou from Pixabay

And it could be that God is actually calling us to be like Jonathan. It was King Saul’s son Jonathan that warned David about his father’s intentions. It is the case that Jesus is calling us to do the same for others? Perhaps.

But if in our lives we become more like King Saul, more concerned how people see us and jealous of the success of others, then we can ultimately suffer the same fate as King Saul. We can become separated from God by removing the focus from God and placing it squarely on ourselves. Don’t let that happen.

Growing in Relationship with God

homily
Image by Big_Heart from Pixabay

When we examine the lives of the great saints, how often is it the case that we hear just how far away from God they feel? As they grow more deeply into the powerful relationship with the other, how much do they feel their own weakness and brokenness? How much more is it that they recognize they need God more and more in their lives? That their relationship with God desires ever greater and greater faith?

I am learning more and more the importance of keeping focus on Jesus. I have worked more and more on seeking a discipline in my prayer. We cannot grow in prayer if it is only sporadic. We cannot grow in prayer if we only think about Jesus occasionally. We need to develop the discipline to make that time where we can be alone in the presence of the Lord.

We live in a society that values action more than prayer. As a Dominican, I am supposed to witness in my life the relationship between active ministry and contemplation. I will be the first to say this is not easy. I am more prone to engage in active ministry, because, truth be told, I get more recognition. People tell me that my ministry is effective.

But that is precisely the point. What got King Saul upset in today’s first reading? That David received greater recognition and greater praise than he did. He became jealous. Rather than focus on the many, many blessings he has as king, he focused on what he did not have.

In Buddhism, this is an example of the ways in which people suffer. Wanting what we do not have is a source of suffering. And we see that clearly in King Saul. Perhaps we can turn our attention today on hearing God say to us, “Be still and know that I am God!

What do you want me to do for you? Master, I want to see.

narcissism
Image by Aline Berry from Pixabay

Listen to our other homilies.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: